What does Adara sound like? | Language Surf

Adara

Eda – Kadara

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a Plateau language of Nigeria, in the Atlantic-Congo family (Niger-Congo)

Speakers

~ 300,000

Dialects

  • Adara
  • Eneje
  • Ada
  • Ekhwa
  • Ajiya
  • Eda
  • Edra
  • Enezhe

Listen

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What does Adangbe sound like? | Language Surf

Adangbe

Agotime – Dangbe

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a Ghana-Togo Mountain language of Ghana and Togo, in the Atlantic-Congo family

Speakers

~ 4,000

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What does Abureni sound like? | Language Surf

Abureni

Mini

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a Central Delta language of Nigeria, in the Atlantic-Congo family

Speakers

~ 4,000

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What does Abure sound like? | Language Surf

Abure

Aboulé – Abonwa – Akaplass

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a Tano language of Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), in the Atlantic-Congo family

Speakers

~ 55,000

Listen

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What does Abishi (Piti) sound like? | Language Surf

Abishi

Piti – Pitti – Bishi – Bisi

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a Kainji language of Nigeria, in the Atlantic-Congo family

Speakers

~ 8,100

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What does Abua sound like? | Language Surf

Abua

Abuan

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a Central Delta language of Nigeria, in the Atlantic-Congo family

Speakers

~ 25,000

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What does Abon sound like? | Language Surf

Abon

Abõ – Abong

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a Tivoid language of Nigeria, in the Atlantic-Congo family

Speakers

~ 1,000

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Nigerian English – learning about the accent

about the Nigerian accent of English with Nigerian national flags in the background
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Hi, I’m Susan Rex from Nigeria and always being a Nigerian (Smiling). I’m thankful to Trystn Waller for giving me this alternative to a guest post about my country Nigeria and its accent (just in brief). I’m a Relationship Coach, helping to build healthy relationships. I hope you like this post and also share your thoughts with me as well.

Contact: (relationtipps@gmail.com)

My website: Link

Main Article


Nigerian spoken English is an amalgamation of British English and American English. The outcome is an imaginative clash of broken English and words that have cheerfully grown eternally distant from their original definitions.

Path to Getting the Nigerian Accent

Cutting out inner syllables

  • Medicine pronounces as “med-sin
  • Happy Birthday pronounces as “api betday
  • Concern pronounces as “consign
  • Get out as “gerrat
  • Start as “stat
  • With as “wit
  • Bathroom as “baffroom” etc.

Swap your “er” for “a”

  • Paper pronounces as “pay-pah
  • Father pronounces as “fathah
  • Mother as “mothah
  • Helicopter as “elucuptah” etc.


Nigerians also pronounce each of these groups of words in the same manner.


  • Work and walk (pronounced as same)
  • Bus and boss (pronounce as same)
  • Saint and sent (pronounce the same)
  • Curb and cub 
  • Hair and air
  • Ear, hear, and here (pronounce the same way).


Having the basic conversation

  🇬🇧 (Standard)

Hi

How are you?

No problem.

I’m walking please.

Please, where is the bathroom?

I don’t know.

I don’t understand.

 🇳🇬 (Non-Standard)

How far.

How you dey?

No wahala.

I dey waka abeg.

Abeg where the baffroom dey?

I no no.

I no sabi.


(Add “No” if you need to say that you don’t understand something or don’t have something. Also, Nigerians refer to older people as Auntie or Uncle, pronounced as “hanty or “uncul”, to show manners and respect.)


Let me remind you that if you are not a Nigerian, it will be hard to blend in with the accent. That’s one of the unique things about being a Nigerian; no one can take that away from us, not even those that colonized us. 

image written Nigeria and a map of Nigeria in the back, landscape of a city in Nigeria in the background
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**I hope you enjoyed this article from Susan Rex and got some better insight into the unique accent of Nigeria! Please feel free to contact her with more questions, and read her website to get advice about healthy relationships. I appreciate you doing this guest post for us, Susan, and I look forward to seeing what others have to add about the Nigerian accent. Stay safe out there, people! Peace.

Read more: the Blog

Listen & Read: a Nigerian song in Lyrics “Explained”