Beautiful Places in Alaska 🇺🇸 – Gallery Images, Videos, & Profile | Earth’s Face

What is there to see in Alaska?


state Flag of Alaska
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ALASKA

Alax̂sxax̂ – Alaasikaq – Alas’kaaq – Alaskaq – Anáaski

Map of the United States with Alaska highlighted
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satellite map of Alaska with major ecoregions and capital city labeled

English: /uh-LAS-kuh/ * /a-LAS-kuh/

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Name Origin

from the term used by Russians to name the Alaska Peninsula, from the Aleut and Yupik languages for “object to which the sea’s action is directed” or “great land

Population

< 736,000

Main Languages

Predominantly English (~ 83%). The next most-spoken language is Spanish (~ 3%), though there are many native languages that are official in the state: Inupiaq, Siberian Yupik, Central Alaskan Yup’ik, Alutiiq, Aleut, Dena’ina, Deng Xinag, Holikachuk, Koyukon, Upper Kuskokwim, Gwich’in, Lower Tanana, Upper Tanana, Tanacross, Hän, Ahtna, Eyak, Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian. All indigenous languages are spoken by small percentages of the population.

Capital

*Juneau

Largest City

Anchorage

Location

Northwestern United States, a partial exclave state separated from the contiguous U.S., in the general Pacific Northwest and Arctic regions. The largest U.S. state, it is mostly on the mainland with many islands, including the Aleutian Islands. It borders Canada to the east / northeast, has Arctic coastline to the north, and Pacific coastline, including the Bering Sea, to the south and west.

Biogeography

Nearctic Realm (a small part in the East Palearctic)

Part of the United States’ Arctic tundra, Boreal forests / taiga, Pacific Range mountains, Arctic Range mountains, Pacific Marine Forests, and Pacific Marine lowlands. Home to North America’s highest mountain, Denali (Mt. McKinley).


Gallery Images & Videos: Places in Alaska

glacier in the woods within Tongass National Forest, Alaska
Tongass National Forest – Matt Artz
iceberg in the water at Tongass National Forest, place in Alaska
Steve Corey
aerial view of large glacier in Chugach National Forest, USA

Chugach National Forest – Izzy Majcher
man walking inside a glacier in Chugach National Forest, Alaska
Paxson Woelber
Alpenglow in the snowy mountains of Chugach National Forest, a place in Alaska
Paxson Woelber
humpback whale leaping from the water in Kenai Fjords National Park
Kenai Fjords National Park – jdegenhardt
opening to a fjord with cliffs and snowy mountains in the distance, Kenai Fjords National Park
CMy23
rocky island ahead of the fjords and snowy mountains of Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska
lwtt93
forested rocks jutting out from the sea on the south coast of Alaska, USA
jdegenhardt
trail leading to a large distant mountain in Denali National Park and Preserve, place in Alaska
Denali National Park and Preserve – Alex Proimos
bright fall colors in a valley in Denali National Park and Preserve, United States
Arthur T. LaBar
running A dog sled in the snow near Denali, Alaska
GPA Photo Archive
flowery garden in front of a white steeple in Fairbanks, Alaska
Fairbanks – kinglear55
aurora borealis (northern lights) above a forest near Fairbanks
Kodachron
view of Attu Island from the sea, Aleutian Islands
Attu Island – Alaska Region U.S. Fish & W
view of towering volcano from the sea on a cloudy day, Aleutian Islands, Alaska
Aleutian Islands – naql
bright blue sea on the jagged coast of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, place in Alaska, USA
Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve – Arthur T. LaBar
rugged glacier in the mountains of Alaska, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve
Don & Suzan Weller
boat sailing below the white mountains of southeastern Alaska
NOAA’s National Ocean Se
small shed in the forested foothills of Wrangell - St. Elias National Park and Reserve
Wrangell – St. Elias National Park and Reserve – NPS CulturalLandscapes
wide landscape in the fall of a town and distant mountains in Wrangell - St. Elias National Park and Reserve
JLS Photography – Alaska
twilight in the city of Anchorage, city in Alaska, USA
Anchorage – marco antonio torres
autumn forest landscape near the mountains and river near Anchorage
Zetong Li
blue lakes in the forests of Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, place in Alaska
Lake Clark National Park and Preserve – GPA Photo Archive
young brown bears wrestling in Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska
Katmai National Park and Preserve – cheryl strahl
caribou crossing a river in Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, place in Alaska
Togiak National Wildlife Refuge – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Servi
green wetlands in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge
Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge – Alaska Region U.S. Fish & W
sunrise in the snowy hills of Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, place in Alaska
Bering Land Bridge National Preserve – Bering Land Bridge Nation
cabins at the foot of a rocky hill in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Alaska, USA
Bering Land Bridge Nation
yellow hills and valley of Noatak National Preserve, United States
Noatak National Preserve – Western Arctic National Pa
fall colors near a snowcapped mountain in Noatak National Preserve, place in Alaska
Western Arctic National Pa
sand dunes and evergreens in Kobuk Valley National Park
Kobuk Valley National Park – Western Arctic National Pa
camping in the fields near stony mountains at Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Alaska
Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve – National Park Service, Alas
yellow flowers on the grassy hills above a river valley in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Servic
a seaplane landing on the waters near Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge, place in Alaska
Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge – Alaska Region U.S. Fish & 
temperate rainforest in the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge
Arthur T. LaBar
mountains mirrored by the water on Kodiak Island
Kodiak Island – naql
herd of bison in the grasslands on coastal Kodiak Island, Alaska
James Brooks
on the Alaska Highway leading to a snowy mountain
Alaska Highway – JLS Photography – Alaska
a polar bear walking on the graveled Arctic coast near the town of Kaktovik, Alaska
town of Kaktovik – Arthur T. LaBar
totem pole closeup near Ketchikan, place in Alaska
town of Ketchikan – Ben Rogers
harbor of the town of Ketchikan, USA
ThreeIfByBike
large spikey rock formation in the snow near Coldfoot, Alaska
Anita Ritenour
rushing rapids along the stony shores of a forest along the Chilkoot Trail
Chilkoot Trail – Joseph
totem pole ahead of the harbor in the town of Haines, Alaska
town of Haines – dancingnomad3
tawny brown mountains and forest near the town of Talkeetna, USA
Talkeetna – JLS Photography – Alaska
a white Russian Orthodox church in the town of Sitka, place in Alaska
town of Sitka – Jeremy Keith
a graveyard in the dense forests near Sitka, Alaska
Melinda Shelton
harbor and docks of Valdez below snowy mountains, Alaska
town of Valdez –-Eric
waterfall on green hills near Valdez, town in Alaska, USA
FairbanksMike
docks below the green and white mountains of Seward, town and place in Alaska state
town of Seward – CMy23
glaciers and iceberg in the Tracy Arm Fjord, Alaska
Tracy Arm Fjord – Alexander Shchukin
view of a lighted cruise ship in the fjords of Juneau at dusk
Juneau – Peter Scholten
a Russian Orthodox church top covered in snow on a clear day in Juneau, capital of Alaska
Brett Johnson
people standing on the sand near a waterfall ahead of a glacier and mountains near the town of Juneau, USA
Rod Ramsell
view from a cable car looking down at other cable car and a cruise ship in the harbor of Juneau, place in Alaska
Fernando Jorge
stream falling through a green valley before cascading into a green lake, scene in Alaska
Rich Manalang

Watch This: Day in the Life of an Asian in America’s Most RACIST Town

Hey y’all! I just wanted to share this video I thought was interesting. It shows some of the hard reality of racism in America, but … It also shows how the majority of people, like anywhere one travels, are decent people. Even in America’s “most racist town.” Enjoy, and let me know what you think.

Watch more videos here: Videos 🎬 – CulSurf

If you liked the video, you might like their other content: CantoMando

Places in Alabama 🇺🇸 – Gallery Images, Videos & Profile | Earth’s Face

What’s in Alabama?


state Flag of Alabama
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ALABAMA

/a-luh-BA-muh/

Listen

Map of the United States with Alabama highlighted
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satellite map of Alabama with major geographic areas

Name Origin

after the Alabama River which is named after the Alabama people, the name refers to someone of Alabama heritage in the Alabama language, could also come from the Choctaw language meaning “clearers of the thicket” or the Creek language for “tribal town

Population

< 5,024,000

Main Languages

Predominantly English (~ 95%). The local accents are known as Alabama English, part of the Southern U.S. variety.

Capital

*Montgomery

Largest City

Huntsville

Birmingham (largest urban area)

Location

Southeastern United States, a state in the general Deep South region, also part of the greater Appalachia and Gulf Coast regions. Has a small coastline on the Gulf of Mexico (Atlantic).

Biogeography

Nearctic Realm

Part of the United States’ eastern Subtropical forests, including Appalachian highlands and Gulf Coast lowlands.


Gallery Images & Videos: Places in Alabama

canon at Fort Gaines, Alabama coast
Fort Gaines – Jimmy Emerson, DVM
large tree on Dauphin Island, Gulf Coast, USA
Dauphin Island – Josh McCausland
home on the beach at Dauphin Island, southern Alabama, USA
faungg’s photos
exhibit inside the Mobile Carnival Museum, place in Alabama
Mobile Carnival Museum – NatalieMaynor
street block and colonial architecture in city of Mobile, Alabama
city of Mobile – Maciek Lulko
famous ship near the coast of Mobile, Gulf of Mexico
Josh Hallett
a path in a Bamboo Forest in central Alabama, USA
Bamboo Forest – Dystopos
snowy ledge and forest overlook in Cheaha State Park, place in Alabama
Cheaha State Park – Outdoor Alabama
view of Birmingham skyline from across a lake, Alabama
Birmingham – Zach Farmer
waterfall in Little River Canyon National Preserve, southern USA
Little River Canyon National Preserve – Jim Bauer
Road Dips Around Little River Canyon, an Alabama highway
Tyler ser Noche
sculpture artwork of chained slaves outside the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, Montgomery
National Memorial for Peace and Justice – Ron Cogswell
interior exhibit at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, place in Alabama
Ron Cogswell
Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, exterior with swimming geese, Alabama, USA
Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts – FlickreviewR
exterior of Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, Montgomery
Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, Montgomery – Ron Cogswell
waterfalls and fall colors in Talladega National Forest, place in Alabama
Talladega National Forest – Rick from Alabama
butterfly on a bright red flower in Huntsville Botanical Gardens, Alabama
Huntsville Botanical Garden – David Ellis
gazebo and pond in Huntsville Botanical Garden, Huntsville, Alabama
David Ellis
view of Huntsville, place in Alabama, USA
city of Huntsville – David Ellis
NASA center in Huntsville, USA
Robert Boston
sunny beach at Gulf Shores, Alabama
Gulf Shores – John Tuggle
sunset and surfer catching a wave ahead of the pier at Orange Beach, Gulf of Mexico, Alabama
Orange Beach – Outdoor Alabama
beachfront of Orange Beach, city in Alabama, USA
Steven Van Elk
stadium at University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa – Andrea Wright
Bellingrath Gardens and Home in Alabama
Bellingrath Gardens – Altairisfar
miniature of cityscape in Ave Maria Grotto, rural Alabama
Ave Maria Grotto – Roger Smith
waterfall in the Sipsey Wilderness of Alabama state
Sipsey Wilderness – Michael Hicks
Moundville Archaeological Site Alabama
Moundville Archaeological Park – Altairisfar
stalagmites in the caves of Cathedral Caverns State Park, place in Alabama
Cathedral Caverns State Park – Outdoor Alabama
carved face in a tree in Orr Park, Alabama
Orr Park – Alby Headrick
a cave entrance in the forests of Alabama, USA
Outdoor Alabama
Natural Bridge in the forests of Alabama, United States
Natural Bridge – Jimmy Emerson, DVM
rock formations inside of DeSoto Caverns, southern USA
DeSoto Caverns – Roger Smith
view from behind Noccalula Falls, place in Alabama
Noccalula Falls – Andy Montgomery
bridge entering a cave in the woods of Dismals Canyon, Alabama
Dismals Canyon – Jimmy Emerson, DVM
waterfall at the entrance of Stephens Gap Cave
wrcochran
light entering the opening of Stephens Gap Cave in Alabama, USA
Stephens Gap Cave – wrcochran
Falls in Walls of Jericho Canyon, a place in northern Alabama
Walls of Jericho – Panoramio upload bot

Do Americans have a culture? – Doubts about the U.S.A.

A Culture? Please …

I know, I know. This might seem like an odd question, but many out there wonder whether or not the U.S. really does have a culture. It’s debated by researchers and academics, even questioned by many Americans themselves. Well, you know I’m going to give you my opinion. But, what is culture in the first place?

Read more: Doubts About Americans

All countries have one (there goes your answer right there), and most countries have specific regional cultures within them. Even many cities have different “cultures” depending on the side of town. This usually happens in a north-south and east-west frame. Think of, say, Eastern and Western China, East and West Russia, North and South Italy, or North and South India. The same differences happen in the U.S., where you get different cultures from north to south and east to west and diagonal and so forth.

Probably the reason many would question whether America or Americans have any culture has more to do with having a culture of their own. Since everybody knows it’s a nation composed almost entirely of immigrants, it’s easy to see why people might question whether the U.S. even has a culture in the first place. Especially for visitors, often the first things they see are Uber and Lyft drivers that can hardly speak English, a Chinese restaurant on the left, a Mexican restaurant on the right, an Indian bazaar, a building that looks just like any other in Europe or somewhere else.

Read more: American ethnicity, American languages

Culture(s) of the U.S.

A lot of that is just on the surface, though. First and foremost, we just need to look at the first nations within our nation. Native Americans were here before “America” was even a thing. They have used hundreds of languages to express their many musical styles, customs, dressing traditions, and cuisines. Many of the food items common in current American cuisines like corn, turkey, different berries, and tomatoes are homegrown, original to the continent. And indigenous art and design are still highly influential, especially in regions like the Southwest and parts of the Midwest.

The Anglos and other British settlers also had a chunk of influence. They brought their heritage, sure, but established a distinct set of folklore, musical styles, attire, and identity altogether. Generally those identities differed from North to South and urban to rural too, where differences in lifestyle, accent, and ideology would diverge those two parts of the country even more. Besides setting the foundation for the United States as we know it, they also gave the nation its main language, now the most prominent and influential version of English on the planet. (Brits, please don’t get mad at me!)

With all that going on, others from Europe like the French, Dutch, Swedes, and Spanish were all pushing their own traditions and styles onto the locations they’d settled. This left Dutch architecture in New York, Spanish architecture in California and Texas, and French architecture in Louisiana. It also gave way to celebrations like Mardi Gras, and the establishment of some of America’s greatest and most iconic cities.

The Africans that were brought over to the New World also made their cultural impact. From their influence on cuisine, especially in the South and Mid-Atlantic, they helped to produce and invent many of the nation’s most iconic and preferred dishes, several with ingredients from the ancestral continent. Lyrical storytelling and passing down vocal history allowed many to preserve their musical traditions. This continues to impact American and World music in a huge way till this day. With some of the most important black social leaders and intellects, African Americans have become some of the most recognizable and admired black individuals known all over the world. Many black people from other countries and colonies also had a huge impact on the nation’s ID. And America’s obsession with athletics, TV, and movies have helped to solidify that role.

Oh, and let’s not forget the many immigrants that came to establish their own unique cultures in the U.S. different from their home lands. I mean, Chicano isn’t quite Mexican, and Nuyorican isn’t quite Puerto Rican (even though Puerto Rican is still American, as much as Guamanian, American Samoan, Mariana, or Virgin Islander is). Just name all the religious sects and denominations that sought refuge here. Heck, many still were persecuted when they got here. Many of their traditional cuisines and customs have been modified to U.S.-style, but there are still places where their customs have been preserved like in their ancestral countries.

Just the Beginning

And that’s just looking at individual groups. I haven’t even begun to talk about consumerism and capitalism, the phenomenon of malls and suburbs, movie culture and car culture, skateboarding and surfing, baseball and basketball, football and the bashing of any other sport that claims to be football, Americana and jukebox nostalgia, hostility and hospitality, Broadway and Hollywood, Main Street and Middle America, country living and the urban rush, the woes of yards and pounds, love-hate feels about war and the admiration of military, the superiority complex and the self-loathing, “pulling up your bootstraps” and the mental health crisis, ranches and rodeos, guns and cowboys, hippies and hipsters, donators and volunteers, scammers and schemers, big enterprise and social media craze, an app for everything and a distrust in politics, religious fundamentalists and homegrown extremists, luaus and hula dancers, freezer food and barbecues, bison and bald eagles, conservative rules, and the sex, swearing, and drugs that never seem to get ruled out.

Read more: American religion, Black Americans

There’s a lot that makes America what it is, but one thing’s for certain; Americans do have a culture … but I’ll let others figure out what that culture actually is.


Thank you for reading! Follow the site or subscribe to receive updates as they happen. You can contact me at tietewaller@gmail.com or Give Me a Shout to collaborate and one-to-one messages. Stay tuned for further posts on this topic!

Aren’t there a lot of black people in America, like on T.V.? – Black identity in the USA

The story of the U.S. is a complicated and controversial one, and few things add to that controversy than the question of race. Topics related to race, slavery, civil rights, citizenship, and even cultural identity can be traced to one of America’s most important groups of people. Speaking of that cultural identity you, as a foreigner, might have noticed that many famous movies (Coming to America, Training Day, Black Panther), T.V. shows (The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Everybody Hates Chris, My Wife and Kids), and social figures (Barack Obama, Martin Luther King Jr., Oprah Winfrey) are African Americans or star lots of black people. When you talk about singers and musical influence, black Americans almost take home the prize for most impactful internationally. With all this influence, you might expect to go to the U.S. and see tons of black folks walking around everywhere. But are there really that many of us?

Fortnite now has a Black Panther skin and a Wakanda Forever emote - Polygon
Even Fortnite uses black culture, Wakanda Forever! from Polygon.com

I previously wrote about the misconception of America being pretty much all white, but this is an interesting turn of thinking. Maybe after seeing and listening to so many things featuring black people, you might conclude:

Hey, there has to be a lot of black people in the U.S., right? Why else would they be so prevalent on T.V. and music and all that?

Well, the answer would be no; black people in America aren’t as prevalent as you might think.

How it can feel to be black in America sometimes… Photo by Nicholas Green on Unsplash

To be fair, even I was surprised by how many African Americans there truly are. Don’t get me wrong, there are lots of black Americans. As I said in a previous post, black people are actually a majority or almost half the population in several cities across the country, in places like New Orleans, Atlanta, Detroit, and many others. Despite all that, there are almost 330 million Americans, and people who identify as only black are 13.4% (about 44 million). So yes, that is a lot of black people, but it’s a small number compared to all the other people in the country.

Of course, you have to remember that many African Americans are not fully “black” but may identify as black because of reasons related to cultural identity, family ties, or simply not thinking that much about the question. You might find a light-skinned person with African ancestry more likely to identify as “black” if he or she grew up around mostly black people, lives around mostly black people, and identifies mostly with black American culture. This goes back to the One Drop Rule in the U.S., to which I’ll leave a link for more information down below. That also leaves us with blacks who might consider themselves “mixed-race” even though they are darker-skinned, but that’s a little less common. By the way, colored and mulatto used to be acceptable terms for mixed people, but they are considered offensive by most people nowadays.

Although black people practically make up a small minority in the U.S., there are reasons why they might seem so prevalent on T.V. and other media. One is that the country is huge! 13 percent of 330 million is still a ton of people, so of course, they seem like a lot. Another point is that many of these people went to urban areas like big cities after slavery and especially after suffering discrimination/violence in the South. Cities are where most of the cultural output comes from, so that’s why we seem to have so many black actors, musicians, musical styles, and social figures. Several of these figures exist purely because of the discrimination blacks have suffered. Black people in politics are on the rise recently too, so that could add to this misconception.

One more point I want to make is that black people have been severely and openly discriminated against in the U.S. for centuries, and people who supported slavery had all kinds of misconceptions about race, ethnicity, and what was good for the nation. Of course black people, and almost any minority in fact, have suffered all over the world, but the U.S. handled it a bit differently. After creating some highly significant social leaders and leading its own power movements, a big push has been made by black Americans to support each other, promote each other, and work with each other. There has been such a big momentum with black people trying to “catch up” with white Americans and have equality that this has allowed black people to be present in almost all facets of American life. Think of “#OscarsSoWhite” and the following year when a ton of black movies and filmmakers won awards. Even though black Americans in general are pretty well represented and better off than black people in almost all other American countries (think of Haiti, Brazil, Cuba, and many African nations for that matter), there is always a push for more equality and representation. I suppose all people deserve this and I’m glad to help represent my country and ancestry, even if it’s in a subtle, blog-writing way.

Black-ish guy making a movie, Photo by KASHILEMBO WABU

Even if there aren’t as much of us as you might have thought, I encourage you to keep listening to our music, keep watching our T.V., and keep supporting our social movements. Black people just want respect like anybody else, and I’m sure that they’d be proud to know how truly influential black U.S. culture has been all over the world. Keep up the support!

Speaking of support, I appreciate you for reading this post! Feel free to check the resources below to learn more and keep an open mind. If you liked this post, read some other ones here on the website. Tell me what you think of black American culture or people in the comments, or send me an email at tietewaller@gmail.com. Cool? Peace and take care!

Resources:

U.S. census info 2019: https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/US/PST045219

America’s “One Drop Rule” explained: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/jefferson/mixed/onedrop.html

About #OscarsSoWhite: https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2016/02/02/oscars-academy-award-nominations-diversity/79645542/