The Many Meanings of Catch (Catch on, Catch up, a Catch, & more) | English Dialogue

Heads up … catch! This seemingly (or should I say “deceptively”) simple word is stuffed and loaded with different meanings. Do the many uses of “catch” confuse you? Here I want to look at the traditional meanings, as well as some common slang and figurative uses of the word. There are also short and realistic dialogues to help. So, are you ready to catch some knowledge? Let’s do it.

The normal meaning of Catch

Normally, to Catch means to receive something that is thrown or has fallen. As people, we mostly catch things with our hands.


 — “Look, Charles, I got you a new iPhone charger. Catch!”

While attempting to grab the charger, Charles accidentally dropped his phone onto the floor.

 — “Gee, thanks! Now I’m going to need a new iPhone too.”

 — “Well, you should have caught it before it hit the ground.”

Catch something (figuratively)

As you can imagine, “catch” also has several figurative and even slang meanings. As a verb, you can catch something not visible such as an illness or some attention.


 — “Did you hear what happened to Kevin Hart? He said he caught the ‘Vid’,” Charles said to his friend, Jonah, sitting behind him. Jonah gave him a firm Shhh! 

 — “Be quiet, man! Whenever I talk in class, I catch an angry look from Ms. Delaware. You’ll get me in trouble.”

‘Catching’ someone

Another meaning is when you catch someone, or find them. Usually, this is while they are doing something they shouldn’t be.

 — “Hey, Sheila. Do you think we could take your little bro out for ice cream?”

 — “I don’t know. He got caught eating cookies out of the cookie jar last night. I think he’s had enough sweets.”

 — “Well, we could always take him to the Salad Bar,” Charles suggested.

 — “Oh, no. You won’t catch me anywhere near that place.”

Still, catch can be about meeting another person, in general. This is usually at a designated time or place.

 — “I hope we can hang out soon, Sheila. What do you think?”

 — “For sure! I’ll catch you after our game tomorrow.”

Other random meanings of Catch

To catch can be to understand what someone else said or what has happened. It’s usually said as a question to check for comprehension or as a way to show a lack of understanding.


Jonah’s mind wandered as he daydreamed about the upcoming game that night. Suddenly, he realized Charles had been mumbling at him for the past five minutes.

 — “Sorry, what did you say? I didn’t catch that.”

 — “I was telling you about my plans to quit working for this lousy school. Did you catch it this time?!”

… Or, going to see something, such as an event. 


 — “Do you want to catch a movie after you get off work?” Charles asked Sheila. She turned at him and grinned.

 — “Yeah … Or, we could go to the game like everyone else.”

Or, boarding a transportation vehicle. 



Sheila gave Charles a big hug.

 — “I have to catch this bus. If you want to see a movie, it’s fine. Can we talk later?”

 — “Yeah, either way is fine. Let me know. Maybe we can catch a ride together.”

Phrasal verbs: Catch on, Catch up

And that’s just “Catch” by itself. Of course, there are also phrasal verbs like catch on — to begin to understand something — or catch up — to reach a desired point in understanding or place from behind.


 — It used to be so much fun to speak in German around your friends. I think they’re starting to learn now.

 — Right, especially Mark didn’t use to understand our conversations, but now he’s catching on.

 — It’s about time! Why is Mark so far behind in his German, anyway? He needs to catch up!

.

A Catch, as a noun

All verbs aside, there is also catch used as a noun. A catch is a hidden condition or problem when something seems too good to be true.


Charles looked at his neighbor in disbelief. 

“You’ll give me this car for four hundred bucks and all repairs are up to date? What’s the catch?”

 — “No catch! It’s a good car, man. What, you don’t believe me?”

.

A catch can also be a person who seems like a perfect match, or a great person to be in a relationship with. They are like the ideal partner.


 — I don’t know why you’re so in-love with Sheila. Look at Jenny. She’s the boss of her own business, helps her community, and owns a Benz. She’s a catch, for sure.

 — “Uh-huh, Jonah. Total catch.”


**These are just some of the main uses of “catch”. Can you think of any others meanings? Can you think of your own examples for these words? Share it with us and spread the English love! Thanks for reading and learning. Take care out there.

Read More:

Contact or collaborate at tietewaller@gmail.com

“Grammy” by Purity Ring (Soulja Boy Cover) | Lyrics for English Students

flag of Canada, country of music duo Purity Ring, performers of the cover Grammy
.
Flag of the United States, home of rapper Soulja Boy, original artist of Grammy lyrics
.
header image for the song Grammy, a cover by Purity Ring
.

I deserve a Grammy! Come on, I know none of you would vote for me. Still, it takes guts to affirm that — positive affirmations — and that’s exactly what this music duo was doing. This cover for “Grammy” by Purity Ring was released as a single in 2013. It takes inspiration from Soulja Boy’s song of the same name on his 2010 album, The DeAndre Way. Below are the lyrics for you to enjoy, as well as the music video. I’ll also add the original song for you all to compare the two. Go ahead!

For better practice, try: First, listen to the song while reading the lyrics. This will help you get familiar with the sounds and rhythm along with the words used. Second, read through the lyrics without the music. Take your time and make sure you understand the words and meanings. Third, listen to the song without reading lyrics. Notice if your understanding of the song / words has improved!

Feel free to ask in the comments if there is something else you didn’t understand or want to know more about. Want more songs like this? Let me know! Now enjoy, and happy listening.

*I want to reiterate that I am not trying to correct anyone’s informal speech or grammar. As native speakers, these concepts come easier to us, but English learners may need help in understanding what the correct way to speak is so they know when and where to break those rules! Thanks for bearing with me.

Videos

.
[Parental Advisory]

“Grammy” (Cover) Lyrics – Purity Ring

What do you want from me?

‘Cause I’ve given you everything

  • Informal Speech: *”Because I’ve given …”

What do you need from me?

Are you not happy with anything?

[Verse]

Party like a rock star, hit ’em with the hot bars

  • Music Reference: “Party Like a Rock Star” was a popular song by hip hop group, the Shop Boyz, from 2007, and this is probably a reference to that.
  • Informal Speech: “*Hit them with the hot bars …”
  • Slang: “Hit” here has a figurative meaning. It’s about the same as offer or give but in an impactful way. “Hot” here means something very good, of excellent quality, and impressive. “Bars” is a slang specific to hip hop and rap music, and describes the lines in the lyrics (like lines in a paragraph or story). So, hot bars are impressive lyrics, basically.

Fast like a NASCAR, lime like my dad’s car

  • Informal Speech: It’s more correct to say, “Fast like NASCAR,” but she conjugated it as if she were only talking about a car, not the whole sports organization. “Fast like a car.” “Lime” describes the color of the car, green.

I deserve a Grammy; will I fly away

Or land on Miami? I don’t have time to rhyme

  • Informal Speech / Grammar: Normally for cities, countries, states, etc., we would say “Land in Miami.” (As in, land down in a plane). The conjugation is interesting though, as if she wants to land on top of Miami, making a huge impact.

But I do have time to grind

  • Slang: “Grind” here means to hustle, put in work to make money.

S.O.D. pirates, I don’t need a hook

  • Cultural References: S.O.D. is something associated with Soulja Boy, the original artist of this song. “Pirates” here probably was used to refer to the treasure-hungry and ruthless reputation of pirates, though it also refers to the famous Captain Hook, a pirate from Peter Pan.
  • Musical Terms / Figurative Speech: A “hook” in music refers to a specific part of the lyrics, similar to bridge and chorus.

My lyrics illustrated verses taken from a book

  • Grammar: *”My lyrics are illustrated, my verses are taken from a book …” Literally, if he’s talking about Peter Pan.

I understand the fans, supply and demand

You Might Like:

Crunk at command, fight and we’ll stand

  • Slang / Cultural Reference: “Crunk” refers to a popular hip hop dance style that was especially big in the late ’90s to early 2000s. It is known for being very aggressive, and some people refer to “getting crunk” when they mean to get aggressive or hostile.
  • Expressions: Being “at command” is being ready to do something at any moment.

Lyrics from a true legend, livin’ life through God’s blessing

Big papers, long acres, top flight, no security

  • Casual Speech / Expressions: “Papers” here refers to money, most likely. It could also be contracts or music deals. “Long acres” refer to big properties with lots of land.
  • Other Meanings: “No security” refers to how people who travel on private jets don’t have to pass through airport security.

Black ice on me, call the jury

  • Slang / Figurative Speech: “Ice” in this case means jewelry. I don’t know of any jewelry that is black, so Soulja Boy might just have been referring to the fact that he is black. “Black ice” in the literal sense is a very thin layer of ice on the road that can’t really be seen but is dangerous for causing skidding and accidents. Maybe the jewelry is so pretty, it’s “dangerous”.
  • Pronunciation: The “jury” is the audience who watches and decides on a verdict during a criminal trial. It also sounds like the way some American accents might pronounce “jewelry – jury.”

Yeah trick yeah, and we call it magic

  • Slang: “Trick” here is a derogatory term against women. Interesting, since Megan from Purity Ring is singing it.
  • Figurative Speech: Also, a trick in normal terms is what a magician would do to deceive the audience, like pulling a rabbit out of a hat. Hence, “call it magic.”

My style may change if you call it drastic

Money so long and we is the measure

  • Slang: “Money is long” means that the money goes a long way. There is a lot of money.
  • Grammar: *”And we are the measure(ment)”

I love my business and I love my pleasure

Live now, die later, internet genius

Self proclaimed, he a critically acclaimed

  • Grammar: *”He is critically acclaimed …”

For the fortune and fame, he’ll run through the rain

  • Expressions: “The rain” here means hard times and difficulties.

For a million in change, takin’ over the game

  • Vocabulary: “Change” is what we call coins or money left over after a purchase. If she has a million left over after buying, imagine how much she spent.
  • Slang: “The game” in this sense refers to a kind of situation or industry. Specifically here, it can be the music game.

18-year-old with a drop top Phantom

  • Cars: This is the Rolls-Royce Phantom. “Drop top” means the top of the car comes down or opens, like a convertible.

Kidnap the world ’til they pay my ransom

DeAndre Way, look what’s tatted on my face

  • Music Reference: The DeAndre Way was a Soulja Boy album from 2010. In the original lyrics, he’s probably referring to the image of his face on the album’s cover.
  • Slang: “Tatted” is a slang word for tattooed, like “tat” is for tattoo. “How do you like my new tats?”

Four words to say: I deserve a Grammy

[Chorus]

What do you want from me?

‘Cause I’ve given you everything

What do you need from me?

Are you not happy with anything?

Is it not good enough?

Am I not good enough?

Have I not gave enough?

  • Grammar: *”Have I not given enough?”

Tell me what do you want from me?

What do you want from me?

‘Cause I’ve given you everything

Then it repeats.


Thank you again for reading and practicing your English (or simply enjoying good music). Check Lyrics “Explained” to find similar songs and practice more. Make sure to post a comment or send us a message, if that sounds better to you 😉 Give Me a Shout! Otherwise, take care, y’all. Peace!

Topic: Why Shoulda, Coulda, Should of, Would of? | English Speaking Habits

Pronouncing Modal Verbs in the Past


Modal verbs? What? As English speakers, we have lots of funny speech habits. To the average person, they may not seem like a big deal. But what about those that have decided to take on learning this complex language?

“Take on me-e … take me o-on!”

You can almost hear English singing in the shower. You might have heard such words as “shoulda” or “coulda” before. Well, that’s what we’re going to talk about here.

What are Modal Verbs, after all?

A modal verb is a type of auxiliary (or helping) verb. This just means their purpose is to help other verbs to make sense. Modal verbs themselves are used to show a necessity or possibility. These are words like could, should, may, might, would, and so on.

In the past tense, modal verbs are often followed by the word “have.” This lets us know they are modals instead of a regular past tense verb. How do we know that “could” is acting like the past tense of “can,” or if it is expressing a possibility? We know it’s a possibility when it’s next to “have.” Look at this:

  • When I was younger, I could run a mile without stopping. (past tense of “can”)
  • I could have been a track star. (past tense of the modal verb “could,” shows a possibility)

Remember, modals don’t always need “have.” Adding it is used to show that this necessity or possibility was in the past. The same goes with should have, may have, might have, would have, and more.

You Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda … Used Correct Grammar

The habit I told you about earlier is that many people turn “have” into a simple shwa sound (“uh”) when talking. They basically get rid of the “h” and “v” sounds. This makes could have sound like coulda.

  • I coulda been a track star. (could have)

This is so common that we have an expression to mimic this; shoulda, coulda, woulda. Or coulda, shoulda, woulda. Woulda, coulda, shoulda? I guess it doesn’t really matter what order you say it in. Some people say this to express when it’s too late to do something and the opportunity has passed. Similar expressions are “that’s too bad,” “too late,” or “keep dreaming.” 

 — You know, I could have been a track star.

 — Yeah! Shoulda, coulda, woulda.

Should of, Could of, Would of

To take it a step further, “have” can completely change and turn into “of.” This isn’t grammatically correct, but it happens because some people might pronounce the “could-a” like “could-uv.” This happens when we mean to contract “could have” and say “could’ve.” The pronunciation of the “of” sounds very similar to that final “ve” sound, so it’s easy to confuse the two in everyday speech. Many people who even know the correct grammar might make a mistake when writing or speaking and say “of” instead of the short “‘ve” because of how easy it is to switch the two. 

More info:

  • ‘Should have’ and ‘should of’ on Quora

*Try saying could of and could’ve out loud. Do you notice how similar they sound? 

Here are some more examples!

See, you shoulda / should of been more careful. 

I coulda / could of been a millionaire. 

She musta / must of been crazy to adopt a lion.


Thank you for reading! Check the Blog to see similar posts.

**Have a question about another English speaking habit? Is there something you don’t understand about the way people talk? Tell me about it and I’ll write a post for you, and offer other resources to better understand!

Contact me to collaborate or send a personal message at tietewaller@gmail.com or go to the Give Me Shout! page.

‘Crush’ by Tessa Violet | Lyrics for English Students

Flag of the United States, home country of Tessa Violet
.
album cover Bad Ideas by Tessa Violet home to her song Crush
.

Sometimes life can get the best of us. One minute we’re focusing hard on a task, and the next we’re scrolling down a complete stranger’s social media page drooling over their hot pics. This is part of the spirit behind this fun and poppy song, today’s subject under study! “Crush” is a song from Tessa Violet’s 2019 album Bad Ideas. Below are the lyrics with some explanations for English learners, helping to clarify some of the confusing grammar, slang, expressions, and cultural points.

For lyrics without my explanations:

For better practice: 1) Listen to the song will reading the lyrics simultaneously; 2) Read through the lyrics and explanations with no music; 3) Listen to the song (and watch the video!) without reading the lyrics and check for understanding.

.

Uh, alright

I can’t focus on what needs to get done

I’m on notice hoping that you don’t run, ah

  • Common Terms / Expressions: Being “on notice” is the same as being alert, paying attention to something like a guard on watch. She’s being careful. By “run,” she means that she hopes the person doesn’t run away.

You think I’m tepid but I’m misdiagnosed

  • Figurative Speech: “Tepid” means lacking passion, enthusiasm, or interest. In more literal contexts, it has to do with the temperature of something being not hot but not cold. Another word for this is “lukewarm.” Basically, this person thinks that Tessa is not that interesting, or maybe she doesn’t seem interested in them. Still, she’s “misdiagnosed,” so the person’s assumption is wrong!

‘Cause I’m a stalker, I seen all of your posts, ah-ah

  • Grammar: *”Because I’m a stalker, I have (I’ve) seen all of your posts …”
  • Vocabulary: You probably know this one, but a “stalker” is someone who follows another person in an obsessive and secretive way. In pop culture, it’s often used in the sense of following someone’s posts and pictures obsessively on social media, usually without that person knowing.

[Bridge]

And I’m just tryna play it cool now

  • Informal Speech: *”And I’m just trying to play …”
  • Slang: To “play it cool” is to try to stay calm, maintain self-composure, and act as if you don’t want something even when you really do.

But that’s not what I wanna do now

  • Informal Speech: *”What I want to do now …”

And I’m not tryna be with you now, you now

Mhm

  • Voice: The way Tessa voices this “Mhm” sound is a funny way to signify that you agree with or acknowledge what someone says.

[Verse 2]

You make it difficult to not overthink

And when I’m with you I turn all shades of pink, ah

  • Figurative Speech: This probably means she is “blushing” or gets embarrassed, shy, etc.

I wanna touch you but don’t wanna be weird

It’s such a rush, I’m thinking, wish you were here, ah-ah

  • Figurative Speech / Expressions: A “rush” is a feeling of intense emotions, usually a mix of excitement and nervousness all wrapped into one.
  • Clarifying: She is thinking, “I wish you were here.”

[Pre-Chorus]

And I’m just tryna play it cool now

But that’s not what I wanna do now

And I’m not tryna be with you now, you now

[Chorus]

But I could be your crush, like, throw you for a rush, like

  • Popular Vocabulary: I think we all know what a “crush” is. Someone that we like or are attracted to but we haven’t told them yet. You can also “have a crush on” someone.
  • Casual Expressions: “Throw you for a rush” just means that she wants to make him feel that rush of emotions we talked about earlier.
  • Culture / Society: Tessa repeats “like” a lot in the lyrics. This is similar to how English speakers, mostly younger generations, tend to repeat “like” as a filler word when they speak. She could be trying to represent herself as a silly young woman who’s losing her thoughts thinking about her “crush”.

Hoping you’d text me so I could tell you

I been thinking ’bout your touch like

  • Grammar: *”I have (I’ve) been thinking about your touch, like …”

Touch, touch, touch, touch, touch

I could be your crush, crush, crush, crush, crush

I got a fascination with your presentation

  • Grammar: *”I have (I’ve) got a fascination …” Also, “I have a fascination …”
  • Figurative Speech: With his physical appearance, dress style.

Making me feel like you’re on my island

You’re my permanent vacation

Touch, touch, touch, touch, touch

I could be your crush, crush, crush, crush, crush

Sorry

  • Other Meanings: This “Sorry” here shows how awkward and weird she can get when thinking about her crush. In the song, she says it in kind of a nerdy way, on purpose.

[Verse 3]

I fill my calendar with stuff I can do

Maybe if I’m busy it could keep me from you

  • Common Expression: To “keep from” something is to stay away from it, not interact with it.

And I’m pretending you ain’t been on my mind

  • Informal Speech: *”And I’m pretending that you haven’t been …”

But I took an interest in the things that you like, ah-ah

  • Expressions: To “take an interest” is to start being interested in something. Another way to say this is to “take up an interest.”

[Pre-Chorus]

And I’m just tryna play it cool now

But that’s not what I wanna do now

And I’m not tryna be with you now, you now

[Chorus]

But I could be your crush, like, throw you for a rush, like

Hopin’ you’d text me so I could tell you

I been thinkin’ ’bout your touch like

Touch, touch, touch, touch, touch

I could be your crush, crush, crush, crush, crush

I got a fascination with your presentation

Makin’ me feel like you’re on my island

You’re my permanent vacation

Touch, touch, touch, touch, touch

I could be your crush, crush, crush, crush, crush

[Bridge]

And yeah, it’s true that I’m a little bit intense, right

  • Other Meanings: Funny, usually when saying “right” at the end of a sentence, it is formed like a question, as if the speaker is asking to confirm something, “Right?” Here, she doesn’t say it like a question. It’s as if she is confirming this information for us. “Yeah, I am a bit intense. It’s true.”

But can you blame me when you keep me on the fence, like?

  • Idioms: To be “on the fence” or be “kept on the fence” is to be in the middle of two decisions. Basically, she is undecided, not sure what to do next.
  • Familiar Speech: This “like” at the end reminds me of how some people use it. “He was walking, real quiet-like.” The “like” doesn’t have a real meaning in this sense, it just adds a bit of emphasis to “quiet,” or “on the fence” in the case of our lyrics. This way of speaking is more old-fashioned but you still hear it in cartoons or for stereotyped movie characters.
  • Other Meanings: The “like?” as a question could also mean that she is waiting for an answer. “I waited for your call and you never did, like?”

You might also like:

Tennis Court Lorde; Habits (Stay High) Tove Lo; Day ‘N’ Nite (Nightmare) Kid Cudi; Dani California Red Hot Chili Peppers; Tighten Up The Black Keys; Carnies Martina Topley-Bird; Colorado Kota the Friend; Don’t Start Dua Lipa; Cameo Lover Kimbra; The Ghost Who Walks Karen Elson; Child Lights; i like the devil Purity Ring; Pleasure Feist; After the Storm Kali Uchis

And I’ve been waiting, hoping that you’d wanna text, like

Text like

(It’s what I was born to do)

And yeah, it’s true that I’m a little bit intense, right

But can you blame me when you keep me on the fence, like?

And I’ve been waiting, hoping that you’d wanna text like (Hey!)

Text like, Ugh

Then the lyrics repeat.

What do you think of this song and the music video? Was this the first time you heard of Tessa Violet, or are you a certified fan? Do you stalk your crush online too? Let us know what you think (just don’t get too personal :D).

Thank you for coming and I hope you enjoyed reading and listening. Take care out there. Spread some love. Peace!

For contact or collaboration: tietewaller@gmail.com or Give me a Shout!

‘Butterfly Effect’ by Travis Scott – Lyrics for English Students

Flag of the United States
.
Astroworld album cover by Travis Scott.jpg
.

“BUTTERFLY EFFECT” is a song by Travis Scott, as you might know, and it came off of his 2017 album, Astroworld. Below are the lyrics with some explanations about expressions, grammar, and other less-obvious meanings of the song. I am no expert on this song or on Travis Scott, but this might help those of you learning or studying English to better understand the words. If you’d like, please watch the video and read the lyrics and explanations. Then take another listen to see how much you understand the second time. Ready?

Read the lyrics without my explanations on Genius

Other explanations: Where is the Butterfly Effect; Interesting Song Facts

More Lyrics “Explained”

“Butterfly Effect” Lyrics & Explanations

All the commas

  • Other meanings: This probably has to do with money. The more commas, the bigger the number is; 1(,)00(,)000(,)000(,) …

Murda on the beat so it’s not nice

  • Other meanings: This is a popular tagline from the producer on this song, Murda Beatz.

Ooh, hmm

For this life, I cannot change

  • Figurative speech / Philosophy: Just a note about the title: the “butterfly effect” is the idea that changing something small or subtle in the past — like killing a butterfly — can lead to a completely different present and future. It’s also the idea that something small like a butterfly beating its wings can make huge ripples (impacts) in time. This theory kind of rings throughout the song as Travis says he cannot change, as if his life is destined to be this way. The lyric also could mean that this new lifestyle cannot change who he really is. But, like a butterfly beating its wings in the past, his impact will be made on the world.

Hidden Hills, deep off in the main

  • Geography / Other meanings: Hidden Hills is an upscale, sort of exclusive city in the north Los Angeles area where lots of rich and famous people live. It also sounds like he could be saying “in the hills” which has the same connotation. That’s because in Los Angeles, many of the rich and fancy neighborhoods are either literally in the hills or have the name “hills.”
  • Not sure: The “deep off in the main” part is a little confusing, but it could just mean that the people in this society have deep ties, deep roots, or deep connections there. Or something else entirely.

M&M’s, sweet like candy cane

  • Figurative speech: We know M&M’s. Some like chocolate and others swear by peanut butter. He could be relating M&M’s to certain drugs like ecstasy, comparing the “high” feeling of being on drugs to a sugar high from eating lots of sweets.

Drop the top, pop it, let it bang

  • Casual speech / Slang: “Drop the top” and “pop the top off” are ways to talk about taking the top off of a convertible car. “Bang” here could refer to playing loud music in the car. These expressions probably have other meanings too that are a little more provocative, so I’ll leave it at that.

For this life, I cannot change

Hidden Hills, deep off in the main

M&M’s, sweet like candy cane

Drop the top, pop it, let it bang

Drop the top, play hide and seek

  • Games: “Hide and seek” is a kids game where one person has to search for other people who are hiding.
  • Figurative speech: He doesn’t literally want to play hide and seek though. This could mean going to look for something or someone, or trying to run away or hide from someone. Doing things discreetly.

Jump inside, jump straight to the league

  • Figurative speech / Slang: Going to “the league” generally refers to young athletes who skip college and go directly into the professional league. He could be referring to someone joining his “team” or his crew. Come play with the big boys. This mixes in with a popular term among some black men to call each other “hitters,” like a baseball player that hits a ball. That’s not what it means, that’s just the relation to being on the team or in the league.

Take a sip, feel just how I be (It’s lit)

  • Grammar: *”Feel just how I am …”
  • Slang / Informal speech: Saying “how I be” refers to how the person lives, how they act on a regular basis, their style. This is very informal, by the way. Saying something is “lit” means that it’s fun, it’s cool, something good will come of it. It’s also one of Travis’s popular sayings.

On Freeway, but no, ain’t nothin’ free (Straight up)

  • Grammar: *”On the freeway, but no, nothing is free …”
  • Slang: Saying “straight up” like this is the same as “for real,” as if to reiterate that the person really means what they say.

Bend laws, bend lanes (Skrrt, skrrt)

  • Expressions: To “bend the law” means to break it basically, to go against the law. “Bending lanes” is driving quickly along turns on street lanes. Hence, skrrt skrrt.

Been bustin’ bills, but still, ain’t nothin’ change

  • Grammar: *”I’ve been busting bills, but still, nothing has changed …”
  • Slang: By “busting bills” he means he’s been spending a lot of money. Still, he makes a ton of money, so his financial situation isn’t affected by this.

You in the mob soon as you rock the chain

  • Grammar: *”You’re in the mob as soon as you rock the chain …”
  • Slang: The “mob” here refers to his crew again. The same goes for “team, squad, gang,” etc. To “rock” in this case means to wear something proudly, especially a certain brand.

She caught the waves, just thumbin’ through my braids (Alright)

person with twisty braids in their head
Some braids for you – Gift Habeshaw
  • Slang / Expressions: To “catch the wave” here means to get high (on drugs) and feel some wavy vibes. To “thumb” through something means to run one’s fingers through it as if to study it, like thumbing a book.
  • Culture / Style: He plays on the idea of waves as a hairstyle since “waves” have been a popular hairstyle for black men for a while.

Heatin’ up, baby, I’m just heatin’ up (It’s lit)

  • Expressions: “Heating up” figuratively means that something is getting started, it’s just beginning. A similar expression is “warming up.”

Need your love, not a need, it is a must

Feelin’ stuck, you know how to keep me up

  • Expressions / Dual meanings: “Keep me up” here means this person keeps him feeling well, positive, and in good spirits. It also has a more provocative meaning, though.

Icy love, icy like a hockey puck (Alright)

a hockey player hitting a puck into a goal, related to a line from Travis Scott's Butterfly Effect song
this hockey puck is icy – Samantha Gades
  • Slang: “Icy” here has a couple of meanings. It can be really cool, chill, relaxed, good-looking, and involving lots of “ice” or diamonds and jewels.

For this life, I cannot change

Hidden Hills, deep off in the main

M&M’s, sweet like candy cane

Drop the top, pop it, let it bang

For this life, I cannot change

Hidden Hills, deep off in the main

M&M’s, sweet like candy cane

Drop the top, pop it, let it bang

All the ones, all the chains piled on the mantle

All the dawgs, all the dawgs low creep right behind me in the Phantom (It’s lit)

front of a rolls royce phantom, related to a lyric from Travis Scott song Butterfly Effect
a scary Phantom – Taras Chernus
  • Slang: “Dawgs” is the same as a guy or a friend. To “creep” in this scenario means to move slowly and watchfully without trying to be noticed. In a car, it sounds like it means driving with the car low to the ground.
  • Regular speech: Saying “right” with a direction just adds emphasis to how close the subject is. “Right next to, right beside, right above, right there.”
  • Cars / Culture: A Phantom is a popular expensive car often referenced in rap / trap music.

Yeah, never go, never go dip on the set, stayed Santana

  • Informal speech / Grammar: *”I stayed like Santana …”
  • Slang: To “dip” in this case means to disappear or abandon something. The “set” is a person’s original “hood,” group or place that they most represent. So, Travis didn’t abandon his origins, in simpler terms.
  • Pop Culture References: He’s probably referencing Juelz Santana who was a part of a rap group called Dipset or the Diplomats.

Yeah, run it back, turn the lights on when I hit up Green Lantern (It’s lit, alright)

  • Expressions / Slang: To “run it back” means to do something again like repeat a song or phrase, or to go back to a place. To “hit up” a place means to visit it or go to it.
  • Personal meaning / Location: He could be talking about a bar in San Antonio called the Green Lantern, since Travis is from Texas and I’ve heard he went to this place.

Yeah, fly the broads, fly the dawgs down to Atlanta

  • Slang: “Broads” is another term for young women. It’s an older term that can be seen as disrespectful to some women.

Yeah, in the cut in Medusa, lay low, yeah, I might be

  • Slang / Expressions: “In the cut” here means that he is in a place, probably a really nice place. It’s one of those non-specific slangs that could be a number of other things too. To “lay low” or “lie low” means to take it easy, relax, not do much work, enjoy one’s time.
  • Life references / Dual meanings: Medusa could be referring to the logo on Versace brand clothing, or a popular restaurant in Atlanta.

Yeah, roll up, help me calm down when I’m movin’ high speed

  • Slang: “Roll up” here refers to rolling up a joint (of cannabis). It could also refer to rolling his window up to feel stronger effects from the weed since we assume he is in a car.

Yeah, if I send one, need to text back ’cause you know what I need (Straight up)

  • Grammar: *”You need to text back because you know what I need …”
  • Deeper meaning: We can only imagine what he might need from this person he’s texting.

Oh, please, oh, me, oh, my

  • Expressions: “Oh me, oh my” is an old-fashioned expression that sounds like a kids song. “Oh my” is a way to show shock or surprise. It’s short for “Oh my God / goodness / word.” Also, saying “Oh, please!” like this can be like telling someone to stop because they are lying or saying something outrageous. “You wrestled a lion? Oh, please!” Of course, it can also be like saying “Please, stop.”

We been movin’, we been movin’ for some time (Alright)

  • Grammar: *”We have / we’ve been moving …”
  • Expressions: “Moving” here refers to making moves, or doing things to make money and have success.

Flexin’, flexin’, try to exercise

a guy flexing with his shirt off in the gym and curling weights, relating to a line a flexing in a travis scott song
Flexing those muscles, brah – Alora Griffiths
  • Slang: “Flex” in this context means to show off, present what you have to everyone else, usually in a way that is misleading. Of course, it relates to flexing a muscle, showing your strength, proving that you have been exercising a lot.

Exercise, exercise, exercise

Then it repeats.

“Day ‘N’ Nite (Nightmare)” by Kid Cudi – Lyrics for English Students

Flag of the United States, home country of rapper Kid Cudi
artist from.

Do you want to know the lyrics to “Day ‘N’ Nite” by Kid Cudi? Great, you’re in the right place! The song was featured on his 2008 album, Man on the Moon: The End of Day, but was also released on a previous mixtape and single. This page is geared toward explaining to English learners some of the expressions, idioms, slang, and cultural points in the song that most native English speakers probably know already.

I suggest reading the song lyrics and explanations first. Then listen to the song with the lyrics to check for comprehension. If you know most of these explanations, then cool. Your language skills are on point! Ready?

Also Listen: Day ‘N’ Nite Remix (Crookers)

Read: for the lyrics without my explanations, Genius

Read more: Lyrics “Explained”

.

Lyrics & Explanations

Day and night

  • Informal Writing: Just a note about the spelling; in the song’s title, “N” is the same as “and” but a popular way to spell it in informal titles or writing. “Nite” is the same as “night” but also an informal alternative spelling. This happens a lot when texting for words that don’t spell like they sound. Ex: Tho (Though), Rite (Right), U (You), 4 (For)

I toss and turn, I keep stressing my mind, mind

  • Expressions: “Tossing and turning” is another way to say that you can’t sleep. It’s a very common expression.

I look for peace, but see, I don’t attain

What I need for keeps, this silly game we play, play

  • Expressions: “For keeps” means something you want to keep or hold on to. It usually means you will win the object you want after playing some game. “Let’s race. Whoever wins gets a new car.” “Are we playing for keeps?”

Now look at this

Madness the magnet keeps attracting me, me

I try to run, but see, I’m not that fast

I think I’m first but surely finish last, last

  • Culture/Literature: This line is reminiscent of a popular fable, “The Tortoise and the Hare.” The two animals race and the hare becomes cocky thinking he will easily beat the tortoise, but the tortoise ends up winning after slowly but steadily staying on track. Maybe Cudi assumes he’s going to win like the hare did, but he gets beat in the end.

‘Cause day and night

  • Informal Speech: *Because day and night …

The lonely stoner seems to free his mind at night

  • Slang: A “stoner” is someone who gets high on drugs, especially cannabis. Similarly, getting “stoned” means getting high on cannabis.

Read more: Stoner

He’s all alone through the day and night

The lonely loner seems to free his mind at night, at, at, at night

  • Other Vocabulary: You might have picked this one up, but a “loner” is someone who spends most of their time alone. They don’t interact much with other people.

Day and night

The lonely stoner seems to free his mind at night

He’s all alone, some things will never change

The lonely loner seems to free his mind at night, at, at, at night

Hold the phone

  • Expressions/Dual Meaning: This one’s pretty obvious, but it can also mean to “wait” in general. This is similar to other expressions like “Hold on,” “Hold up,” and “Hold it.” These all mean to wait. Even though “hold the phone” sounds pretty specific, there are other phrases like this that mean to wait. Ex: “Hold the front door,” and “Hold your horses.” These are a little more silly and informal, though.

The lonely stoner, Mr. Solo Dolo

  • Popular Vocabulary: “Solo” means solitary or alone. I think we got it from Spanish but it’s pretty common to say that you are “solo” or doing something “solo.”
  • Informal/Unusual Expressions: “Dolo” I think is the same as solo. I haven’t heard this expression much, but I guess “solo-dolo” means being alone but feeling relaxed or okay about it.
  • Figurative Speech: Saying “Mr.” before some kind of quality means that the person is full of that quality, as if they were the owner of it. “Okay, Mr. Bossy, you don’t have to order people around all the time.”

He’s on the move, can’t seem to shake the shade

  • Idiom: Being “on the move” is to be active in making plans or moving from place to place.
  • Slang: To “shake” in this sense means to avoid or escape something, like to shake off. “The cops are behind us. I can’t shake them.” Shade here has the sense of something ominous or sad. In slang, “shade” can also be general disrespect or dislike that comes from people who don’t like you. A similar concept is “hating on” someone.

Within his dreams he sees the life he made, made

  • Slang/Possible Dual Meaning: The repeating of “made” here reminds me of another expression. Saying that someone is “made” or they “have it made” is like saying they have everything they dreamed of, they have all the success they could want. They’re living the good life. They “have it made.”

The pain is deep

A silent sleeper, you won’t hear a peep, peep

  • Other Vocabulary: “Peep” is any very small sound. It’s usually said in phrases like “won’t hear a peep” or “don’t make a peep.”

The girl he wants don’t seem to want him too

  • Grammar/Informal Speech: *The girl he wants doesn’t seem to want him either … The way he says it sounds better in this case, though.

It seems the feelings that she had are through, through

  • Common Speech: When something is “through,” it means it is done or over. It has ended.

‘Cause day and night

The lonely stoner seems to free his mind at night

He’s all alone through the day and night

The lonely loner seems to free his mind at night, at, at, at night

Day and night

The lonely stoner seems to free his mind at night

He’s all alone, some things will never change

The lonely loner seems to free his mind at night, at, at, at night

Slow mo’

  • Slang/Casual Expression: “Slow mo” means slow motion. Here, he says it probably to mean slow down or wait.

When the tempo slows up and creates that new, new

  • Foreign/Musical Term: When used in English, “tempo” specifically has to do with the speed of a rhythm, like in music. It has almost become synonymous with speed. I believe it comes from Italian.
  • Slang/Informal Expression: To “slow up” is the same as to slow down or go slower, interestingly enough. It is just another cool way to express this idea. “New new” is a fun concept. It basically means something that is new or hasn’t been experienced before, like an emerging trend. It’s like saying “new thing” but the focus is on the impact of that new thing as opposed to the new thing itself. “You still wear the old brands, but I’ve got that new new. You want to see some?”

Read more: New new

He seems alive though he is feeling blue

  • Slang/Idiom: We probably all know this one, but feeling “blue” is feeling sad.

The sun is shining, man he’s super cool, cool

  • Expressions: “Man” here is just an exclamation, it doesn’t mean anything really.
  • Informal Speech: The way he pronounces “cool” is a very common way to say it in some accents. It also rhymes a lot better with blue.

The lonely nights

They fade away, he slips into his white Nikes

  • Casual Expression: To “slip into” something means to wear it or put it on. “I’m going to slip into a nice dress.”
  • Informal/Alternative Speech: The way he pronounces Nikes (referring to shoes) is an informal way that only certain communities say, though it can also just be an alternative or sarcastic way of pronouncing it. It also rhymes better with nights.

He smokes a clip and then he’s on the way

  • Slang: Smoking a “clip” is smoking the leftovers of a blunt of cannabis.
  • Idiom/Expressions: To be “on the way” means to be arriving somewhere or going somewhere specific.

To free his mind in search of, to free his mind in search of

To free his mind in search of

Day and night

The lonely stoner seems to free his mind at night

He’s all alone through the day and night

The lonely loner seems to free his mind at night, at, at, at night

Day and night

The lonely stoner seems to free his mind at night

He’s all alone, some things will never change

The lonely loner seems to free his mind at night

At, at, at night, night

At, at, at night, night

Na-na-na-na-na-na, Kid Cudi

Cleveland status, grind all day

  • Casual Expressions: Adding “status” after something like a quality or a place means that person is acting like that quality or representing that place. “He’s on Brooklyn status with his Nets jersey and his old Brooklyn Dodger hat.”
  • Slang: To “grind” in this case means to work hard and put in an effort. A similar concept is to be “on your grind.”

Read more: Grind

Then it repeats …

**I hope you enjoyed reading the lyrics to “Day ‘N’ Nite.” Did you understand these pretty well? What part of the lyrics do you still have trouble with? Tell us what your favorite lines are, or what other songs you like by Kid Cudi. You can contact me personally at tietewaller@gmail.com or to collaborate. Read more posts like this one at Lyrics “Explained.” Thank you for coming! Peace.

“Depth trap dive”- figurative meanings and uses of ‘Deep’

the bright entrance of a large dark cave, representing the literal meaning of deep
Ian Chen

The guys didn’t know it, but they were looking down a deep hole. Well, a cave or sinkhole would be the technical terms. Charles was sweating in the heat of the beating sun. His helmet smudged the dirt on his forehead. He looked over to his friend, Jonah, to see how he was getting along.

–So, how do you feel about going down? You’re not having second thoughts, are you? Charles asked.

Jonah responded, –What? Second thoughts! I’m not scared. Besides, we paid all that money to go down into this deep hole.

–Oh, I’m not scared. I was just making sure you weren’t gonna run at the last minute. Life is too short to miss out on self-enriching opportunities like … deep cave diving.

Jonah laughed a bit.

–Wow, I didn’t know you were so deep, my friend.

Deep

“Deep” normally has the meaning of something with a large depth, like deep water or a deep hole, in this case. As a figurative expression deep has a similar meaning of depth or something being profound. The difference is that it has to do with a topic or idea that is very thoughtful, meaningful, or sincere. Sometimes people can say this in a sarcastic way, but the idea is still the same.

Read more: some literal and figurative meanings of Deep

Besides, we paid all that money to go down into this deep hole.

  • To go down into a hole with a lot of physical depth, deep into the earth.

–Wow, I didn’t know you were so deep, my friend.

  • I didn’t know you were so thoughtful, that you had such profound and meaningful ideas.

.

Storytime …

Charles told him, –Yeah, I’m always coming up with cool ideas. I’m starting to really consider leaving my job at the college and just working full-time at the theater. It’s the pandemic anyway, so forget it.

At that moment, the caving instructor, Amy, found the two friends chatting.

–Okay, that’s all the equipment, fellas. Ready to go spelunking? Amy asked.

Jonah and Charles gazed at each other with a dumbfound look. A lightbulb then clicked over Jonah’s head.

–Ohhh! You mean cave diving. I had to think for a second.

Amy laughed and took the lead moving downward into the deep dark cavern. Jonah followed soon before Charles and talked with him on the way down.

–So you said you’re going to do stage design full time. How’s that going?

Charles told him, –I don’t know. I’d like to just walk away and commit to the theater, but I’m afraid I might be in too deep with the financial department.

.

In Deep – Deep Into

Taking in the same meaning of “deep,” being deep into something gives the sense that one is deeply committed to a situation or person. This could be a positive thing, like being in a serious relationship. However, it can also give off the sense that someone is into something they can’t escape from. This can show that the person is in some kind of trouble they can’t get out of. The same idea comes from the expression in deep, though this one is usually for romantic situations.

… but I’m afraid I might be in too deep with the financial department.

  • I might have too big of a commitment, too much to risk, I might be stuck at my current job. Also could say, “I might be too deep in with my job.”

.

Storytime …

Jonah tried to sympathize with his friend’s predicament.

–That is a touch choice. I mean, do you choose the job you want and love, or do you stick around at that boring financial department? Sounds like you’re in the deep end.

.

Deep end

Being in the deep end has a very similar meaning to “in deep.” The idea is still of being under pressure, underwater, or on your toes. It’s a difficult situation to get out of, a hard place to leave from. In other words, “You’re stuck.”

Sounds like you’re in the deep end.

  • It sounds like you’re in a difficult place, have a really tough decision, have nowhere to run to.

.

Storytime …

–Are you all okay? asked Amy. She looked up from the dark with a bright smile on her face.

The two men gave her one thumbs-up each. Before they knew it they had reached the cave floor. Charles opened his mouth to say another deep thought when he was interrupted by a swarm of bats. They screeched and squealed over the three humans, trying to find a place to hide.

Jonah screamed out, –Oh, crap! These are the bats that had the Corona. Fight! Run!

Jonah and Charles started swatting at the little creatures while Amy sat patiently. Jonah didn’t like that.

–What the heck are you doing, Amy? You need to come and help us kill these Covid-19 bats. They just flew in about 50-deep and there’s only three of us here. We need to band together.

.

Deep

So, this use of deep is a little less common than the others. Saying this refers to an amount of people, normally said with a number and then the object. It is supposed to refer to people anyway, but as you can see, Jonah uses it in a joking way to refer to bats. It’s also mostly used to say that “X” amount of people/creatures arrived at a place. Using “deep” in this way is probably more regional and I’m not sure if it’s common outside of my region or country. Still, you may hear it at some point.

They just flew in about 50-deep and there’s only three of us here

  • They flew in with fifty individuals, fifty of them arrived together.

The Ending …

Charles had the same thought as Jonah.

–Yeah, Amy. Why aren’t you doing anything?

Their instructor only turned her head. As the cloud of bats began to clear, she pointed a light at the back of the cave and splayed her luminous smile.

–Look over there!

The two friends immediately turned their heads and found what they had been “spelunking” all this time for. There were several huge columns of stalagmites and crystals shining from the top to the rocky bottom. The friends were utterly shocked, and Charles felt moved to say something.

–Mother Earth must love us humans to offer us such a beautiful sight.

Amy smiled and looked over at Jonah.

–Wow, you’re friend is so deep!

**Read more Adventures of Charles and learn other English expressions and slang. Contact me for a personal message or to collaborate at tietewaller@gmail.com. Follow to get emailed every time a new article is posted. Thanks for reading and take care of yourselves! Peace.

Nigerian English – learning about the accent

about the Nigerian accent of English with Nigerian national flags in the background
.

Hi, I’m Susan Rex from Nigeria and always being a Nigerian (Smiling). I’m thankful to Trystn Waller for giving me this alternative to a guest post about my country Nigeria and its accent (just in brief). I’m a Relationship Coach, helping to build healthy relationships. I hope you like this post and also share your thoughts with me as well.

Contact: (relationtipps@gmail.com)

My website: Link

Main Article


Nigerian spoken English is an amalgamation of British English and American English. The outcome is an imaginative clash of broken English and words that have cheerfully grown eternally distant from their original definitions.

Path to Getting the Nigerian Accent

Cutting out inner syllables

  • Medicine pronounces as “med-sin
  • Happy Birthday pronounces as “api betday
  • Concern pronounces as “consign
  • Get out as “gerrat
  • Start as “stat
  • With as “wit
  • Bathroom as “baffroom” etc.

Swap your “er” for “a”

  • Paper pronounces as “pay-pah
  • Father pronounces as “fathah
  • Mother as “mothah
  • Helicopter as “elucuptah” etc.


Nigerians also pronounce each of these groups of words in the same manner.


  • Work and walk (pronounced as same)
  • Bus and boss (pronounce as same)
  • Saint and sent (pronounce the same)
  • Curb and cub 
  • Hair and air
  • Ear, hear, and here (pronounce the same way).


Having the basic conversation

  🇬🇧 (Standard)

Hi

How are you?

No problem.

I’m walking please.

Please, where is the bathroom?

I don’t know.

I don’t understand.

 🇳🇬 (Non-Standard)

How far.

How you dey?

No wahala.

I dey waka abeg.

Abeg where the baffroom dey?

I no no.

I no sabi.


(Add “No” if you need to say that you don’t understand something or don’t have something. Also, Nigerians refer to older people as Auntie or Uncle, pronounced as “hanty or “uncul”, to show manners and respect.)


Let me remind you that if you are not a Nigerian, it will be hard to blend in with the accent. That’s one of the unique things about being a Nigerian; no one can take that away from us, not even those that colonized us. 

image written Nigeria and a map of Nigeria in the back, landscape of a city in Nigeria in the background
.

**I hope you enjoyed this article from Susan Rex and got some better insight into the unique accent of Nigeria! Please feel free to contact her with more questions, and read her website to get advice about healthy relationships. I appreciate you doing this guest post for us, Susan, and I look forward to seeing what others have to add about the Nigerian accent. Stay safe out there, people! Peace.

Read more: the Blog

Listen & Read: a Nigerian song in Lyrics “Explained”

Asking Questions with or without ‘Do’ & ‘To be’? – English Habits

There is a habit that many people have and, maybe, don’t know it. In casual speech, many English speakers tend not to form questions properly. This can happen on purpose so that the speaker can make themselves not sound too formal. Sometimes though, it can be an accident. Well, I’m not here to say whether it is right or wrong but just to show you English learners what’s happening when you hear this. To refresh your memory on the right way to ask questions, you can read this page. Read about other English speaker habits on the Blog. Following are two habits with asking questions that English speakers have:

Questions without “Do”

One of the most noticeable question-related habits is with the verb, to “do.” This little word is confusing for many non-English speakers, but it helps us understand that what we are saying is a question. In other words, it’s an “auxiliary.” With that said, “do” gets left out of a lot of questions in regular conversation.

  • “What you want from me?”

Correct is: What do you want from me?

You can see that “do” just gets dropped out. This also happens in questions that don’t have question words (AKA What, Where, Who, etc.)

  • “You have a dollar I can borrow?”

Correct is: Do you have a dollar I can borrow?

If you speak a language like Spanish, then you do this regularly anyway. “Do” just lets us know that we’re forming a question without having to change our tone of voice to sound more “questiony.”

Questions without “To be”

Another habit people have when forming questions is leaving out the verb “to be” where it should be.

  • “What you doing this weekend?”

Correct is: What are you doing this weekend?

Just like with “do” before, the version of “to be” (are) gets completely dropped. This habit is more common in longer questions. It would usually sound weird in a short question with only a few words.

  • “Who you?” This sounds weird. It’s better to say, Who are you?

Doing this with questions that describe an action is more common in general casual English. Doing it in questions where the main verb is “to be” sounds somewhat uneducated and very improper. In “What are you doing?”, doing is the main verb because that’s the main action. In the question “Who are you?”, are is the main verb because, well, it’s the only verb.

  • “What your name?” This sounds very improper. It’s better to say, What‘s your name?

Remember, people do this without really thinking about it. It’s more for you to understand what’s happening as opposed to trying to memorize this feature. This habit also can happen in questions without question words, of course.

  • “That going to be a problem?”

Correct is: Is that going to be a problem?

A Note …

These are pretty common habits for many English speakers, though not all. It can depend on region or accent, and some habits are more common with certain accents than others. Because these habits are widely practiced, many people don’t even notice them in casual speech. But beware; sometimes dropping the “do” or “to be” can sound very improper, incorrect, and make the speaker sound sloppy or uneducated. Listen to other English speakers and pay attention to how people react to the things they say. This is a good way to tell if that habit is acceptable or not in X situation.

More Examples

Without “do”:

“What __ you think about the new mayor?”

“__ They know they’re being watched?”

“__ He just say that?”

Without “to be”:

“__ You some kind of genius or something?”

“What __ we doing here, anyway?”

“__ That a threat?”

**Hey again! Thanks for reading and learning more, my wonderful reader. Continue to be encouraged in your learning journey. You can do it! And share with us anything that’s on your mind to share about this topic, if you can. Talk soon…

Featured image credit: by Emily Morter on Unsplash