About CultSurf

Sharing the culture of my (complex, ahem) country, my life experiences, and some creative writing here and there. *Positive energy* Ah, e às vezes escrevo em português :)

“Grammy” by Purity Ring (Soulja Boy Cover) | Lyrics for English Students

flag of Canada, country of music duo Purity Ring, performers of the cover Grammy
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Flag of the United States, home of rapper Soulja Boy, original artist of Grammy lyrics
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header image for the song Grammy, a cover by Purity Ring
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I deserve a Grammy! Come on, I know none of you would vote for me. Still, it takes guts to affirm that — positive affirmations — and that’s exactly what this music duo was doing. This cover for “Grammy” by Purity Ring was released as a single in 2013. It takes inspiration from Soulja Boy’s song of the same name on his 2010 album, The DeAndre Way. Below are the lyrics for you to enjoy, as well as the music video. I’ll also add the original song for you all to compare the two. Go ahead!

For better practice, try: First, listen to the song while reading the lyrics. This will help you get familiar with the sounds and rhythm along with the words used. Second, read through the lyrics without the music. Take your time and make sure you understand the words and meanings. Third, listen to the song without reading lyrics. Notice if your understanding of the song / words has improved!

Feel free to ask in the comments if there is something else you didn’t understand or want to know more about. Want more songs like this? Let me know! Now enjoy, and happy listening.

*I want to reiterate that I am not trying to correct anyone’s informal speech or grammar. As native speakers, these concepts come easier to us, but English learners may need help in understanding what the correct way to speak is so they know when and where to break those rules! Thanks for bearing with me.

Videos

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[Parental Advisory]

“Grammy” (Cover) Lyrics – Purity Ring

What do you want from me?

‘Cause I’ve given you everything

  • Informal Speech: *”Because I’ve given …”

What do you need from me?

Are you not happy with anything?

[Verse]

Party like a rock star, hit ’em with the hot bars

  • Music Reference: “Party Like a Rock Star” was a popular song by hip hop group, the Shop Boyz, from 2007, and this is probably a reference to that.
  • Informal Speech: “*Hit them with the hot bars …”
  • Slang: “Hit” here has a figurative meaning. It’s about the same as offer or give but in an impactful way. “Hot” here means something very good, of excellent quality, and impressive. “Bars” is a slang specific to hip hop and rap music, and describes the lines in the lyrics (like lines in a paragraph or story). So, hot bars are impressive lyrics, basically.

Fast like a NASCAR, lime like my dad’s car

  • Informal Speech: It’s more correct to say, “Fast like NASCAR,” but she conjugated it as if she were only talking about a car, not the whole sports organization. “Fast like a car.” “Lime” describes the color of the car, green.

I deserve a Grammy; will I fly away

Or land on Miami? I don’t have time to rhyme

  • Informal Speech / Grammar: Normally for cities, countries, states, etc., we would say “Land in Miami.” (As in, land down in a plane). The conjugation is interesting though, as if she wants to land on top of Miami, making a huge impact.

But I do have time to grind

  • Slang: “Grind” here means to hustle, put in work to make money.

S.O.D. pirates, I don’t need a hook

  • Cultural References: S.O.D. is something associated with Soulja Boy, the original artist of this song. “Pirates” here probably was used to refer to the treasure-hungry and ruthless reputation of pirates, though it also refers to the famous Captain Hook, a pirate from Peter Pan.
  • Musical Terms / Figurative Speech: A “hook” in music refers to a specific part of the lyrics, similar to bridge and chorus.

My lyrics illustrated verses taken from a book

  • Grammar: *”My lyrics are illustrated, my verses are taken from a book …” Literally, if he’s talking about Peter Pan.

I understand the fans, supply and demand

You Might Like:

Crunk at command, fight and we’ll stand

  • Slang / Cultural Reference: “Crunk” refers to a popular hip hop dance style that was especially big in the late ’90s to early 2000s. It is known for being very aggressive, and some people refer to “getting crunk” when they mean to get aggressive or hostile.
  • Expressions: Being “at command” is being ready to do something at any moment.

Lyrics from a true legend, livin’ life through God’s blessing

Big papers, long acres, top flight, no security

  • Casual Speech / Expressions: “Papers” here refers to money, most likely. It could also be contracts or music deals. “Long acres” refer to big properties with lots of land.
  • Other Meanings: “No security” refers to how people who travel on private jets don’t have to pass through airport security.

Black ice on me, call the jury

  • Slang / Figurative Speech: “Ice” in this case means jewelry. I don’t know of any jewelry that is black, so Soulja Boy might just have been referring to the fact that he is black. “Black ice” in the literal sense is a very thin layer of ice on the road that can’t really be seen but is dangerous for causing skidding and accidents. Maybe the jewelry is so pretty, it’s “dangerous”.
  • Pronunciation: The “jury” is the audience who watches and decides on a verdict during a criminal trial. It also sounds like the way some American accents might pronounce “jewelry – jury.”

Yeah trick yeah, and we call it magic

  • Slang: “Trick” here is a derogatory term against women. Interesting, since Megan from Purity Ring is singing it.
  • Figurative Speech: Also, a trick in normal terms is what a magician would do to deceive the audience, like pulling a rabbit out of a hat. Hence, “call it magic.”

My style may change if you call it drastic

Money so long and we is the measure

  • Slang: “Money is long” means that the money goes a long way. There is a lot of money.
  • Grammar: *”And we are the measure(ment)”

I love my business and I love my pleasure

Live now, die later, internet genius

Self proclaimed, he a critically acclaimed

  • Grammar: *”He is critically acclaimed …”

For the fortune and fame, he’ll run through the rain

  • Expressions: “The rain” here means hard times and difficulties.

For a million in change, takin’ over the game

  • Vocabulary: “Change” is what we call coins or money left over after a purchase. If she has a million left over after buying, imagine how much she spent.
  • Slang: “The game” in this sense refers to a kind of situation or industry. Specifically here, it can be the music game.

18-year-old with a drop top Phantom

  • Cars: This is the Rolls-Royce Phantom. “Drop top” means the top of the car comes down or opens, like a convertible.

Kidnap the world ’til they pay my ransom

DeAndre Way, look what’s tatted on my face

  • Music Reference: The DeAndre Way was a Soulja Boy album from 2010. In the original lyrics, he’s probably referring to the image of his face on the album’s cover.
  • Slang: “Tatted” is a slang word for tattooed, like “tat” is for tattoo. “How do you like my new tats?”

Four words to say: I deserve a Grammy

[Chorus]

What do you want from me?

‘Cause I’ve given you everything

What do you need from me?

Are you not happy with anything?

Is it not good enough?

Am I not good enough?

Have I not gave enough?

  • Grammar: *”Have I not given enough?”

Tell me what do you want from me?

What do you want from me?

‘Cause I’ve given you everything

Then it repeats.


Thank you again for reading and practicing your English (or simply enjoying good music). Check Lyrics “Explained” to find similar songs and practice more. Make sure to post a comment or send us a message, if that sounds better to you 😉 Give Me a Shout! Otherwise, take care, y’all. Peace!

What does Adi sound like? | Language Surf

Adi

Abor – Lhoba

World flag showing different countries flags, represent world languages and what languages like Adi sound like
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a group of Tani languages of India, in the Sino-Tibetan family

Speakers

~ 150,000

Languages & Dialects

  • Abor
    • Abor-Minyong
    • Bor-abor (Padam)
    • Abor-Miri
  • Lhoba
    • Lho-Pa
    • Luoba

Listen

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*Do you speak this language or have an audio of it? Share it with us in the comments, or send a message!

What does Adele language sound like? | Language Surf

Adele

Gidire

World flag showing different countries flags, represent world languages and what languages like Adele sound like
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a Ghana-Togo Mountain language of Ghana and Togo, in the Atlantic-Congo family (Niger-Congo)

Speakers

~ 37,000

Listen

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Places in Nunavut – Gallery Images, Videos, & Profile | Earth’s Face

territory Flag of Nunavut
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NUNAVUT

ᓄᓇᕗᑦ

English:

/NOO-na-voot/ /NUU-na-vuut/ /NUH-na-vuht/

Listen

French:

/noo-ne-VOOT/

Listen

Inuktitut

/NOO-nah-voot/

Canadian Provinces and Territories map, Nunavut highlighted in red
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satellite map of Nunavut
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Name Origin

from the Inuktitut language meaning “our land

Population

< 39,500

Main Languages

Mostly Inuktitut (~ 63%). The second most spoken language is the local variety of English (~ 31%). French and Inuinnaqtun are also official in the territory.

Capital & Largest City

Iqaluit

Location

Northern Canada, a federal territory in the general Arctic region. Has a lot of Arctic Ocean coastline along with islands in the Arctic Archipelago and throughout Hudson Bay, including Canada’s largest, Baffin Island. Location is split between the mainland section and its many large and small islands.

Biogeography

Nearctic Realm

Part of Canada’s Arctic tundra, taiga shield, and Arctic Cordillera mountains. Home to some of the world’s largest islands.


Gallery Images & Videos: Places in Nunavut

Inuit structure in the snows of Rankin Inlet, Nunavut
Rankin Inlet – m e a n d r e a
stony river and waterfall at Ukkusiksalik National Park, place in Nunavut
Ukkusiksalik National Park – Gierszep
polar boar walking on icebergs in Nunavut, Canada
Ansgar Walk
Inuit inuksuit statues on a bay near Iqaluit, capital of Nunavut territory
Iqaluit – Isaac Demeester
the Igloo Cathedral in the town of Iqaluit, Northern Canada
Igloo Cathedral – Jennifer Rector
Inuksuk statue overlooking the town of Iqaluit
Jeremy Rahn
icy landscape at dawn somewhere in Nunavut territory
annelope
urban art mural of a smiling inuit woman, Iqaluit
Axel Drainville
tabletop mountains in Auyuittuq National Park, dawn and snowy landscape, place in Nunavut
Auyuittuq National Park – Nuno Luciano
hikers in a valley ahead of towering mountains in Auyuittuq National Park, Canada
Peter Morgan
flying over sweeping white scenery and snowy mountains and canyons in Nunavut, Ellesmere Island
Ellesmere Island – NASA ICE
Hiking the rocks below the Stoke's Range in Qausuittuq National Park, place in Nunavut
Qausuittuq National Park – Paul Gierszewski
station overlooking snowy plains with a weak morning sun, northern tundra of Canada
Buie
Bylot Island from sea ice, crack in the ice leading to the mountains, Sirmilik National Park, Nunavut
Sirmilik National Park – Paul Gierszewski
snow-topped mountains and cliffs in Quttinirpaaq National Park, far-northern Canada
Quttinirpaaq National Park – Ansgar Walk
Arctic fox running in the snow, Quttinirpaaq National Park
Ansgar Walk
icy waters ahead of the mountainous tundra on an island in Nunavut, Canada
Ralph Earlandson
Mount Thor, Akshayuk Pass, Baffin Island, Canada
Mount Thor – Paul Gierszewski
cliffs at the Tip of Prince Leopold Island, place in Nunavut
Prince Leopold Island – Timkal
people sitting on a Qamutik sled on a snowy day in Nunavut
Qamutik sled – Ansgar Walk
solar-charged igloos at night
Mike Beauregard
bright red mosses on the gravely ground and view of the bay in Cape Dorset, place in Nunavut
Cape Dorset – Se Mo
view of the town of Pond Inlet covered in snow ahead of mountains, Nunavut, Canada
Pond Inlet – Ansgar Walk
boats sailing a section of the Northwest Passage viewed from the coast of Nunavut
Northwest Passage – Martha de Jong-Lantink
a vast snowy landscape with small arctic plants at sunrise, arctic Canada
Steve Sayles

What does Adara sound like? | Language Surf

Adara

Eda – Kadara

World flag showing different countries flags, represent world languages and what languages like Adara sound like
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a Plateau language of Nigeria, in the Atlantic-Congo family (Niger-Congo)

Speakers

~ 300,000

Dialects

  • Adara
  • Eneje
  • Ada
  • Ekhwa
  • Ajiya
  • Eda
  • Edra
  • Enezhe

Listen

Listen Here

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What does Adangbe sound like? | Language Surf

Adangbe

Agotime – Dangbe

World flag showing different countries flags, represent world languages and what languages like Adangbe sound like
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a Ghana-Togo Mountain language of Ghana and Togo, in the Atlantic-Congo family

Speakers

~ 4,000

Listen

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About the Nearctic Realm – What is it? | Culture & Biogeography

world map with question marks on it, related to biogeography and the nearctic realm
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Realm? What are we, crossing through the wardrobe of Narnia? It sounds a bit fancy, but Biogeographic (or Zoogeographic) Realms are a way that scientists have divided the world to connect its main biological and geographic features. The continents in all their glory can be a confusing and misrepresentative way to look at the world. We’ve discussed if Bio-Realms might be a better way to divide our planet before. Here, I want to go deeper into one realm in particular, including some of its main physical and cultural features. Don’t mind me, I just love geography–and biogeography, apparently.

world map highlighting the nearctic realm in green
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What is the Nearctic?

The Nearctic Realm is a part of the wider “Arctic” Biogeographical Realm that stretches across much of the Northern Hemisphere. It’s Ne-arctic, as in “New,” because it’s in the New World. That is, the world that was unknown by Eurasians and Africans up until a recent point. That is, the Americas. Put together with the Palearctic (“Old World” Arctic), they can be called the Holarctic (or the whole Arctic!). The Nearctic happens to coincide with what most people think of when they picture “North America.” It includes everything in that continent starting from the Arctic — including Greenland — and goes down until we reach the tropics. In the Southwest, this cutoff is somewhere in the middle of Mexico, while in the Southeast, the cutoff is Central Florida. 

Since we’re talking about the limitations of the realm, let’s look at the political geography. Only two countries take up the bulk of the Nearctic:

  • Canada
  • the United States

A good chunk of Mexico is in the Nearctic, though most of the country probably isn’t (it depends on definitions). Nearctic Mexico would be the deserts, shrublands, and temperate mountains in the north. The Kingdom of Denmark sneaks its way in by way of the massive constituent country, Greenland. France also has a piece by way of a tiny territory off the coast of Newfoundland called St. Pierre & Miquelon. Otherwise, that’s it!

Geography of the Nearctic

The Nearctic is known for having large, somewhat continuous biome types. Some major ones to remember are the Arctic tundra, Boreal forests / taiga, the Great Plains, the Nearctic (or North American) deserts, and the Eastern temperate forests. Much of those forests have been heavily urbanized or used for agriculture, but there are still some trees if you look. Oh, it’s not that bad.

cacti and flora in the sonora desert, southwestern nearctic realm
Sonora Desert – Brian Henderson

The realm is home to tons of lakes, big and small, with the largest (Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan, etc.) being in the Great Lakes region. There are also some seriously long rivers here too, with some notable mentions being the Missouri, the Mississippi, the Yukon, and the Rio Grande.

forest, lake, and mountain scene in the rocky mountains, a major feature of the nearctic realm
Rocky Mountains – G. Lamar

Major mountain systems include the famous Rockies, the Pacific Ranges (or Cordillera), the East and West Sierra Madres, and the Appalachians. They are all very extensive too. The Rockies stretch from the Southwest United States up into Northern Canada. The Pacific Ranges basically run up the entire Pacific Coast. Depending on definition, the Appalachians go from the hills of Mississippi to the rocky shores of Newfoundland. Another big one is the Arctic Cordillera, a set of rugged mountains that stretch from Northern Labrador and Quebec all the way up to Canada’s Arctic Archipelago. 

unique temperate rainforest in the pacific northwest region of north america
Temperate Rainforest, Pacific Northwest – Tjflex2

There are a couple of biomes that stand out from the rest of the realm. The Pacific Northwest is home to the biggest — or longest — temperate rainforest in the world. On the other end, Appalachia is home to pockets of temperate rain and cloud forests. A large section of the Gulf Coast, especially around Louisiana, is home to vast wetlands and swamps called bayous. 

ice cap in the arctic tundra of canada
Ice cap in Canadian Arctic – NASA ICE

Another distinct area is Greenland’s Arctic desert (that’s right, they can be cold). That biome is a dry, snowy wilderness covered in snow year-round. Since we’re in the “Ne-Arctic,” the weather is just about everything but tropical. As we saw, it ranges from moist forests to dry prairies and arid deserts. Mediterranean climate is common in the matorral and chaparral shrublands of the West. Parts of the southeastern Nearctic aren’t quite tropical, but do have a humid subtropical climate. The main ecoregions include subtropical forests, temperate mixed and conifer forests, boreal forests, temperate and subtropical grasslands and plains, tundra, Mediterranean wood and shrublands, deserts, and even mangroves off the coast of Northwestern Mexico.

Ecology of the Nearctic

The Nearctic is home to many plants and animals. Some of the common big fauna are antelope (pronghorns), bison, wolves, foxes, bobcats, lynx, cougars (or mountain lions), deer, bighorn sheep, moose, bears, and musk oxen. There are also tons of rodents like rabbits, gophers, and squirrels, as well as beavers and porcupines. Armadillos, peccaries, and opossums came from further south. There are lots of bovids (cows) and horses too, but those were mostly introduced later. Camels, horses, and even a kind of cheetah were native to this region but endemic species have all died out.

turkey, an endemic and common fowl in the nearctic zone
Turkey – Tim Lumley

Alligators are common in some parts, as are many other reptiles, amphibians, and everything else. Major birds are crows, cardinals, turkeys, and hummingbirds, as well as many owls, hawks, eagles, ducks, geese, condors, and pelicans. Different berries and flowers, as well as specialized desert, tundra, and temperate zone plants are also found here. See this article for some interesting flora in North America.

Let’s Get Some Culture … of the Nearctic

As I mentioned before, one of the cool things about Bio-Realms is how they kind of coincide with human cultural interactions too. The dominating cultures in this realm tend to be this “Neo-Anglo” culture of the North American variety (it’s quite different from Neo-Anglo culture in the Caribbean, for example), and a Latin American culture, also of the North American variety. Neo-Anglo culture is strongest throughout, especially in much of the U.S. and Canada. Still, Latino culture is strong in the Southwest of the region. This is mostly in Mexico (duh!), but also in bordering U.S. states and several urban areas throughout the realm. 

“Neo-Franco” culture is strong in some areas like Canada, especially in Quebec province. It also has some influence in parts of Louisiana or St. Pierre & Miquelon, of course. Besides being a part of the same three countries, these areas are heavily influential in each other’s history and contemporary identities. They receive many immigrants amongst one another and share languages, slang, music, and cuisine across borders. 

Indigenous cultures are also still around, though much subtler than in the Neotropical Realm. Their cultures are more visible in the Western United States and Mexico or rural Canada. This is also true of the Arctic where the many Inuit peoples have a distinct culture and identity. Match that with Greenland where there’s this funky mix of Inuit and Danish cultural cues. 


We’ve come to the end of the Nearctic Realm, but there’s so much more to explore. What other cultural ties do the people of this realm share? Are there any other cool animals, plants, or geographic features you can think of in this realm? Had you heard about the Nearctic before? Tell us in the comments!

Follow if you enjoyed the article and feel free to read more posts. Thanks as always for stopping by. Sending you good vibrations. Peace!

**Ask me more or collaborate with CulSurf: tietewaller@gmail.com; Give Me a Shout!

What does Adang sound like? | Language Surf

Adang

World flag showing different countries flags, represent world languages and what languages like Adang sound like
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an Alor language of Indonesia, in the Timor-Alor-Pantar family

Speakers

~12,200

Distinct Dialects

  • Hamap
  • Kabola

Listen

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Places in Yukon – Gallery Images, Videos, & Profile | Earth’s Face 🇨🇦

territorial Flag of Yukon, Canada
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YUKON

English: /YOO-kahn/

Listen

French: /yu-KON/

Listen

Canadian Provinces and Territories, the Yukon highlighted in red
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satellite map image of the Yukon territory
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Name Origin

after the Yukon River, possibly from the Gwich’in language for “white water river” or “great river

Population

~ 42,600

Main Languages

Predominantly English (~ 83%). The next most spoken language is French, also an official language in the territory (~ 4%). Both languages are spoken in local Canadian varieties.

Capital & Largest City

Whitehorse

Location

Northwestern Canada, a federal territory in the general Arctic and Pacific Mountains regions. Has some Arctic Ocean coastline to the north and borders the United States (Alaska) to the west.

Biogeography

Nearctic Realm

Part of Canada’s Pacific Cordillera mountains, Taiga Cordillera mountains, and taiga plains, with some Arctic tundra. Home to Mount Logan, Canada’s tallest mountain (2nd tallest in North America).


Gallery Images & Videos: Places in Yukon

totem poles made of hubcaps in Yukon, Canada
JLS Photography – Alaska
emerald lake with mountain backdrop, popular place in Yukon
Emerald Lake – JAYRNIV
dunes at the Carcross Desert, southern Yukon, Canada
Carcross Desert – teamscuby
monument of an indigenous person canoeing at the Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre in Whitehorse
Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre – Travis
the SS Klondike in the snow in Whitehorse, Canada
SS Klondike – Gareth Sloan
northern lights (aurora borealis) in Whitehorse, famous sight in Yukon territory
Whitehorse – Studiolit
a bend at Miles Canyon, outside of Whitehorse
Miles Canyon – Timothy Neesam
a bend at Miles Canyon, a place in Yukon
Diego Delso
high snowy mountain peaks with sun rays reflecting, part of Yukon
Richard Droker
mountains, forests and a winding river in Kluane National Park and Reserve, place in Yukon
Kluane National Park and Reserve – Kalen Emsley
a wood stump on the stony shores of a river ahead of mountains in Kluane National Park and Reserve, the Yukon
WherezJeff
downtown hotel in Dawson City on a snowy day, northwestern Canada
Dawson City – Arthur T. LaBar
person walking on the road on the scenic Dempster Highway, Yukon
Dempster Highway – Joseph
mountain crest in the fields of Ivvavik National Park, a place in Yukon
Ivvavik National Park – Daniel Case
rugged beds of a river in the landscapes of Ivvavik National Park, in the Yukon
Daniel Case
flooded wetlands of Vuntut National Park, a place in Yukon
Vuntut National Park – Крис Кирзик
a section of a river in snowy frozen landscape at dawn in Yukon
Keith Williams
a section of the Yukon River in a snowy landscape with the sun barely over the horizon
Yukon River – Keith Williams
a boat/ canoe on a wide section of the Yukon River, Canada
Camera Eye Photography
white clouded mountains towering over a dark forest in the Yukon, near the Alaska Highway
Alaska Highway – Goran Vlacic
a section of the Alaska Highway with forests and snowy mountain backdrops in the Yukon
JLS Photography – Alaska
a dog sled team running in the snowy landscapes of the Yukon, Canada
Arthur T. LaBar
a unique black bear in the flowery fields of Yukon Wildlife Preserve, place in Canada
Yukon Wildlife Preserve – Keith Williams
a sweeping valley landscape in the Tombstone Territorial Park, a place in Yukon
Tombstone Territorial Park – Bo Mertz
bright purple/pink flowers on the shores of the Alsek River with mountains behind, the Yukon
Alsek River – zug zwang
moose antlers left ahead of the curving Alsek River in Yukon
zug zwang
a bald eagle perched near the Tatshenshini River in Yukon, Canada
Tatshenshini River – Matt Zimmerman
snowy mountains seen from the inside of a small passenger plane, flying over the Yukon
Jack Church

What does Achuar-Shiwiar sound like? | Language Surf

Achuar-Shiwiar

Shiwiar – Achuar – Jivaro – Maina

World flag showing different countries flags, represent world languages and what languages like Achuar-Shiwiar sound like
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a Jivaroan language of Peru and Ecuador, in the Chicham family

Speakers

~ 7,500

Listen

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